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20 Oct

Teenagers Are Quitting HS Sports Due to Body Image Concerns Driven by Social Media

More teens are quitting HS sports saying they don’t look right for the sports based on what they see in the media and social media, according to a new study.

Health News Results - 134

"Trigger warnings" are now widely accepted as away to help people avoid harm from disturbing content. Trouble is, they just don't work, according to new research.

Trigger warnings seem like an obvious good: They alert people that a book, video or other media will depict a fraught topic such as sexual assault, abuse or suicide.

Forewarned, consumers can skip the content or a...

Whether or not you have loved ones in the Middle East, the horrors of the violence and suffering in Israel and Gaza are heart-wrenching and difficult to bear.

“It's important to be informed, but don't stress yourself out," said Dr. Gary Small, chair of psychi...

For a needed mood boost, skip social media and strike up an in-person conversation with someone instead.

Face-to-face socializing boosts mood more than screen time, a new study finds.

People often expect that will be the case, but they don't always follow that instinct, according to the researchers.

"These findings suggest that people may use their smartphones because th...

For parents worried about how Disney princesses might impact their child's self-image, a new study is saying, “Let it go.”

“In children's media, about 60% of the characters are men and boys, they're male. And Disney princesses are probably one of the more visible and more well-known examples of media, made for children specifically, that's focused on female characters and women's st...

Video games and social media are keeping school kids up at night, according to a new survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).

But so, too, are more constructive pursuits, including homework and extracurricular activities, which can be a problem when it comes to setting a good sleep routine early in the school year.

“Getting enough sleep is just as crucial as nutr...

The idea of “doing your own research” didn't begin with the pandemic, but new research suggests that those who follow that ideology have been more likely to believe COVID misinformation.

“We had heard the phrase a lot before,” prior to the pandemic, said researcher Sedona Chinn, a professor of life sciences ...

Here's another reason to get your kids up and moving: Excessive TV watching in childhood leads to a higher risk of metabolic syndrome at age 45, a new long-term study finds.

“What's really important about this is that even if these sedentary kids decided somewhere along the line, like in their 20s, that they wanted to get active, they still had increased metabolic risk at age 45. So th...

The herbal supplement berberine has become the latest social-media obsession for weight-loss, with some on TikTok calling it “nature's Ozempic.”

Experts don't agree.

“I would say it's a big exaggeration to call it ‘nature's Ozempic,'” said Dr...

Teens need their sleep, and a new study sheds light on one way to help them get it: Keep cellphones and screens out of the bedroom.

“Getting enough sleep is crucial for teenagers because it helps their body and mind grow and develop properly,” said lead author Dr. Jason Nagata, an assistant professor of pediatrics at...

Social media presents a “profound risk” to young brains, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy warned on Tuesday.

In a report, Murthy warned a...

Half of U.S. parents think social media is bad for their kids' mental health, a new survey reveals.

The finding highlights growing concerns about how these platforms affect children's and adolescents' well-being, according to the On Our Sleeves Movement for Children's Mental Health, which had the Harris Poll conduct the survey.

The program encourages parents to help their kids by t...

It's not new for young people to develop an interest in their favorite pop singer or actor, but it can be problematic if that adoration turns toxic.

It's easier than ever to get lost in a celebrity's carefully curated image via social media posts, according to Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, which offers some tips for when fandom goes too far.

“Artists may do things that e...

Don't rely on TikTok for accurate health information about mpox, the virus once known as monkeypox, a new study says.

An international group of researchers who watched and analyzed videos about mpox on the social media site found them to be often inaccurate, incomplete and of poor quality. Study findings were published May 14 in

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 15, 2023
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  • Alarmed by the increasing spread of medical misinformation, 50 U.S. medical and science organizations have announced the formation of a new group that aims to debunk fake health news.

    Called the Coalition for Trust in Health & Science, the group brings together reputable associations representing American academics, researchers, scientists, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, drug and insurance...

    When researchers searched for a stock image of a pregnant Hispanic woman for a science communication effort, they hit upon a problem.

    Many of the images were of young, light-skinned people without the diversity in age or race needed for projects aimed at other groups, their study...

    Television ads for drugs are filled with glowing images of people living their best lives, all thanks to that new med they've been prescribed.

    But drugs being touted on TV often have little to no benefit compared to other treatments, a new study published online Jan. 13 in JAMA...

    In today's highly polarized political environment, is it possible to stay up-to-date with the news of the day without getting totally stressed out?

    If not, is there a way to limit the emotional and physical fallout? Or is all that individual stress in service of a greater societal good?

    New research paints a complex picture with no easy answers.

    On the one hand, paying cl...

    Preteens who spend much of their free time watching online videos or playing video games may have a heightened risk of developing obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among 9,200 9- and 10-year-olds they assessed, the odds of developing OCD inched up ...

    Medicare Advantage ads that are confusing or misleading could be banned under a new rule that was proposed Wednesday by the Biden administration to protect seniors.

    Nearly half of all seniors or people with disabilities who are enrolled in the Medicare program through the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have Medicare Advantage plans.

    “CMS released a proposed...

    The band Coldplay said Wednesday that it has to postpone several shows in Brazil because its lead singer, Chris Martin, has a “serious lung infection" and must rest for the next three weeks.

    The band made the

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 5, 2022
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  • Misusing over-the-counter medications can have dangerous consequences, but recent social media trends encouraging this could be downright deadly for gullible teens, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday.

    One concerning trend has been a challenge that encouraged people to cook chicken in NyQu...

    Internet hotheads are often literally that, with hateful tweets rising in number as temperatures soar, a new study reports.

    Temperatures higher than 86 degrees Fahrenheit are consistently linked to heavy increases in online hate messages, according to a review of more than 4 billion English-language tweets.

    The researchers identified a “feel-good window” between 54 and 70 degree...

    Many teenagers have a hard time discerning between accurate health messages and “fake news," a new study finds.

    Presented with a choice between fake and true health messages, about two in five teenagers considered both messages equally trustworthy, researchers found...

    When the wildly popular TV show “This Is Us” wrapped up its final season this year, it did so with a storyline that showed one of the lead characters dealing with Alzheimer's disease as her adult children disagreed over the type of care she should receive.

    Now, a new online survey of more than 700...

    From the COVID-19 pandemic and the spread of monkeypox to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, school shootings and devastating wildfires, there's been no lack of doom and gloom lately, and many folks are glued to the news.

    For more than 16% of people, however, compulsive news watching can be seriously problematic and is linked to a host of physical and

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 24, 2022
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  • Older adults who get a lot of "screen time" may have an increased risk of developing dementia — but a lot depends on what type of screen they use, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that among older British adults, those w...

    Most parents are overlooking simple steps to protect their kids' eyes from overexposure to electronic screens, a new nationwide poll shows.

    One in 7 respondents said their 3- to 18-year-olds haven't had a vision test in two years. Yet half of respondents acknowledged that screen time has a big imp...

    The potent influence of social media may include tobacco use.

    By analyzing 29 previously published studies, researchers found that people who viewed social media that contained tobacco content were more than twice as likely to report using tobacco and were more likely to use it in the future, compared to those who never v...

    Dr. Shaun Murphy, the lead character in "The Good Doctor," is a brilliant medical mind who also happens to have autism.

    He's not the only television character you may know and love who navigates the challenges of ...

    Facebook and Instagram have started taking down posts that offer abortion pills to women who may not be able to get them after the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade.

    These posts told women how to get

  • By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 28, 2022
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  • It's tempting to binge-watch TV shows, and it might be hard to get off the couch after just one or two episodes.

    But it could be worth it.

    Researchers calculated that if people committed to watching just under an hour of TV a day, 11% of coronary heart disease cases could be eliminated.

    Thoug...

    Folks often believe that video games rot a kid's mind, but a new study argues the opposite could be true.

    Children actually might get a brain boost from playing hour after hour of video games, researchers report.

    American kids between 9 and 10 years of age who spent more time playing video games experienced a significant increase in their intelligence scores when retested two years ...

    It's no secret that too much social media can be bad for one's mental health. Now, research suggests that taking even a brief break from TikTok, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter can ease symptoms of depression and

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • May 11, 2022
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  • About one-third of cancer nutrition information on the social media site Pinterest is misleading and posted by businesses trying to sell products, according to a new study.

    "Our results revealed a significant amount of misinformation about cancer and nutrition," said study co-author Tracy Crane, an assoc...

    In the fall of 2021, TikTok announced a major milestone to coincide with its fifth anniversary: The amassing of roughly 1 billion global users, many of them young, turning to the app every month as a way to view, make and share bite-sized videos.

    But what exactly do those young users think of the app? Is it a boon to their self-esteem and creativity, or an addictive time-waster that crea...

    An investigation into health misinformation on COVID-19 has been launched by U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy.

    "Misinformation has had a profound impact on COVID-19 and our response," Murthy told CNN. "Studies have demonstrated that the vast majority of the American public either believes common myths about COVID-19 or thinks those myths might be true. And many of those incl...

    For reasons that remain murky, new research warns that a spike in social media use during the pandemic might have worsened tic disorders in children.

    Tics are sudden twitches, movements or sounds that people do repeatedly because they can't control their body.

    In the study, 90% of 20 tic patients aged ...

    Journalistic fact checks do more to combat the spread of COVID-19 misinformation than false tags used by social media companies, a new study finds.

    Journalistic fact checks not only flag a post as false, but also provide information refuting the fake claim with links to more information.

    "We find that more information may be an

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  • February 18, 2022
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  • You have almost certainly seen the pleas while scrolling through social media: Called crowdfunding, folks try to raise money to pay for their sick loved one's mounting medical bills.

    But new research shows these grassroots campaigns rarely raise enough money to make a difference.

    According to GoFundMe, which corner...

    The images are never-ending: Celebrities like Kim Kardashian posting one sultry shot after another on social media. But new research warns this constant barrage of "perfect" bodies can undermine the self-esteem of young women.

    They're apt to feel their own figures come up short by comparison --- whether th...

    Some recreational pot shops are using tricks from the old playbooks of alcohol and tobacco companies to target underage users on social media, a new study reports.

    Despite state laws restricting such marketing, researchers found marijuana retailers on social media promoting their wares with posts that:

    • Featured cartoon characters like Snoopy, SpongeBob SquarePants, and Rick and...

    Who hasn't started to watch a new drama series on TV, and suddenly realize that hours have slipped by as they binged on one episode after the next?

    Now, a new study suggests that too much binge-watching may raise the risk of life-threatening blood clots in the legs or lungs by 35%.

    "Prolonged TV viewing, which involves immobilization, may increase the risk of venous thromboembolism,...

    Images of people eating and drinking are a staple of social media, but new research finds such posts from celebrities often puts the spotlight squarely on junk food.

    Profit isn't always the reason why, investigators found: Celebrities often highlight unhealthy food favorites without getting paid for it.

    "Ninety-five percent of photos that contain foods and beverages on celebrities' ...

    Is your teen staring at their smartphone all day? There's many things parents can do to protect kids from the potentially negative effects of social media, experts say.

    While there are positive aspects to social media, there's evidence it can pose risks to teens' mental health due ...

    When it comes to what makes us happy, is reading or listening to music any better than spending hours playing video games?

    Not really, says a team of researchers from the United Kingdom and Austria.

    "Many people believe traditional media, like reading books or listening to music, are good for us," said study leader Niklas Johannes, from the University of Oxford.

    "Surprisingly...

    Think what happens online stays online? Think again.

    According to new research, a social media diss can leave people feeling genuinely hurt and ostracized.

    "Social media ostracism means being excluded or ignored online on social media networks like Instagram, Facebook or Twitter," explained lead study author Christiane Büttner. She's a PhD candidate in the department of social psy...

    A new mental health media platform meant to connect people with educational resources and reduce the stigma around mental illness is planned by pop star Selena Gomez and her partners.

    Wondermind is set to launch in February 2022 and will include mental health experts sharing their expertise, and daily exercises that people can do to strengthen their mental health, CNN reported.

    Will boys fixated on gore-filled video games become violent in real life? Many parents may worry that's the case, but new and reassuring research finds violent video games don't trigger actual violence in kids.

    The study included boys aged 8 to 18, the group most likely to play violent video games, and examined two types of violence: aggression against other people, and destruction of thi...

    Doctors who discuss COVID-19 in the media frequently face abuse and harassment, including threats of death or violence, a new report reveals.

    More than two-thirds of experts surveyed have experienced trolling or personal attacks after speaking about COVID-19 in media interviews, a worldwide survey of more than 300 scientists found.

    Further, a quarter said such harassment is a freque...

    Even in normal times, getting regular exercise and spending less time on screens can be good for kids. So it should come as no surprise that researchers discovered that kids who exercised more and used technology less during the pandemic had better mental health outcomes.

    "Both as a pediatrician and as a mother, it was obvious that the circumstances of the pandemic -- school closures, res...

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