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Results for search "Medical Technology: Misc.".

21 Sep

ChatGPT Diagnoses Patients ‘Like a Human Doctor,’ Study Finds

A new study suggests ChatGPT performs as well as doctors in diagnosing emergency department patients and may shorten hospital wait times.

08 May

Common Medical Procedures Creating an Abundance of Environmental Waste, Study Finds

A new study looks at the environmental impact of important GI procedures – from waste generation to energy consumption.

22 Feb

Could Your Smart Watch Interfere with Your Pacemaker?

A new study finds smart watches and other wellness trackers may interfere with pacemakers and other implantable cardiac devices.

Health News Results - 228

Advisors to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will weigh the possibilities and parameters of experiments with artificial wombs for premature human babies.

Scientists have already had some success with the concept in animals.

During a two-day

Emergency medicine doctors someday might rely on consultation from artificial intelligence (AI) programs like ChatGPT to help them quickly and accurately diagnose patients’ ailments.

A new study found that ChatGPT performed about as well as human doctors in diagnosing patients, when both are given the same set of clinical information.

“In the end, they were pretty comparable,”...

Whole-body MRI scans are the latest health fad to be promoted by celebrities, with Kim Kardashian taking to Instagram last month to tout the practice.

But doctors are warning that such whole-body scans, while tempting, are pricey and not all that accurate.

In fact, the average person is more likely to be unnecessarily harmed by having a whole-body MRI than helped by catching a disea...

Receiving an organ transplant can be a nerve-wracking, if lifesaving, affair, said Dr. Joaquin Brieva, a kidney transplant recipient.

“Within two days of my transplant, my kidney function was back to normal, but then you worry about the possibility of ...

For the first time ever, a solid humanized organ has been grown from scratch in an animal — a first step in a process that could potentially solve organ shortages and save countless lives.

Chinese researchers grew partially human early-stage kidneys inside embryonic pigs, using a variety of genetic engineering techniques, a new report reveals.

“This study demonstrates proof-of-p...

Another study is showing that artificial intelligence (AI) is as good as a specialist doctor in spotting breast cancer on a mammogram. But don't expect computers to take over the job from humans, experts say.

In a study that compared the mammography-reading skills of an AI tool with those of more than 500 medical professionals, researchers found that it was basically a tie.

On avera...

AI might not always be your most accurate source of health information, especially when it comes to cancer care, new research finds.

Two new studies assessed the quality of responses offered by AI chatbots to a variety of questions about cancer care.

One, published Aug. 24 in

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 24, 2023
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  • Many people with Lou Gehrig’s disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), first start to lose the ability to move their arms and legs.

    That's not Pat Bennett. She can move just fine. She can still dress herself, and she can even use her fingers to type.

    But ALS has robbed Bennett, 68, of her ability to speak. She can no longer use the muscles of her lips, tongue, lar...

    The famous Pink Floyd lyrics emerge from sound that is muddy, yet musical:

    “All in all, it was just a brick in the wall.”

    But this particular recording didn't come from the 1979 album "The Wall," or from a Pink Floyd concert.

    Instead, researchers created it from the reconstituted brainwaves of people listening to the song “Another Brick in the Wall, Part 1.”

    A small battery-operated device long used as a treatment for pain may also help patients with sleep apnea, a British study suggests.

    Sleep apnea is a condition that impedes breathing during sleep, reduces oxygen intake and undermines sleep itself.

    The remedy: zapping sleepers with continuous but controlled electric pulses to open obstructed airways, improve breathing and restore sle...

    A new brain-zapping technology may help ease the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children without some of the side effects stimulant medications can cause, a small, preliminary study suggests.

    Marked by trouble concentrating, sitting still and/or controlling impulsive behaviors, ADHD affects about 5.3 million children, according to Children and Adults with A...

    Artificial intelligence (AI) programs can safely be used to help radiologists review mammogram images and detect breast cancers, early results from an ongoing clinical trial show.

    A single radiologist aided by AI wound up detecting about 20% more breast cancers from mammogram images than two radiologists working together, according to a report in the August issue of The Lancet Oncolog...

    Scientists have developed a wearable ultrasound patch that might eventually allow women to monitor themselves for early signs of breast cancer in the comfort of their home.

    The achievement, reported July 28 in the journal Science Advances, is the latest in a broader research effort to make wearable ultrasound a reality.

    The hope is to one day use such portable technology t...

    Wearable devices like smartwatches continually track physical activity, urging folks to take more daily steps for their health.

    Now, a new study suggests this gentle technological nagging could be of great benefit to people whose hearts are giving out.

    Heart failure patients who get between 1,000 and 5,000 steps a day have significantly improved symptoms and fewer physical limitatio...

    A technique that uses imaging technology as a guide can make radiation therapy safer for patients undergoing treatment for prostate cancer, a new research review finds.

    The technology enables clinicians to accurately aim the radiation beams at the prostate, while avoiding bladder, urethra and rectal tissue. This, in turn, reduces short-term side effects for patients, according to research...

    ChatGPT may have some of the reasoning skills doctors need to diagnose and treat health problems, a pair of studies suggests — though no one is predicting that chatbots will replace humans in lab coats.

    In one study, researchers found that — with the r...

    A multinational team of engineers and surgeons has developed a bionic hand with a high level of function in every finger -- a significant advance for amputees.

    The team, from the United States, Sweden, Australia and Italy, developed a way to reconfigure what remains of a patient's limb. Then, they integrated sensors and a skeletal implant to connect with a prosthesis both electrically an...

    Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) tool capable of deciphering a brain tumor's genetic code in real time, during surgery — an advance they say could speed diagnosis and personalize patients' treatment.

    The researchers trained the AI tool to recognize the different genetic features of gliomas, a group of tumors that constitute the most common form of brain cancer a...

    An experimental implant now under development could serve as a temporary monitor and pacemaker for ailing heart patients -- then dissolve away when it's no longer needed.

    The soft, lightweight and transparent implant is about the size of a postage stamp, and is made of polymers and metals that are biodegradable, researchers reported July 5 in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 7, 2023
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  • Could a grocery cart save lives by preventing possible strokes? It just might.

    The notion stems from a new British study in which grocery cart handles were embedded with electrocardiogram (EKG) sensors.

    The goal: to screen shoppers for undiagnosed cases of atrial fibrillation (a-fib), the most common heart rhythm disorder.

    “Atrial fibrillation is a leading cause of stroke,...

    Smartphones are already handy devices, but researchers have now developed an additional use for them -- to check for a fever.

    An app called FeverPhone is the first ever to transform a smartphone into a personal thermometer without adding new hardware to the device, according to its developers from the University of Washington (UW).

    The app uses the phone's touchscreen and repurposes...

    The benefits of noninvasive imaging may soon be available to patients at high risk of coronary artery disease, according to researchers studying a newer technology.

    That technology is called ultra-high-resolution coronary CT angiography.

    Currently, patients have coronary CT angiography (CCTA), which is highly effective for ruling out coronary artery disease when it's used in patient...

    New York University doctors and hospital executives are using an artificial intelligence (AI) computer program to predict whether a newly discharged patient will soon fall sick enough to be readmitted.

    The AI program “NYUTron” reads physicians' notes to estimate a patient's risk of dying, the potential length of their hospital stay, and other factors important to their care.

    Tes...

    Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies like ChatGPT someday may make a big difference for people seeking answers to questions such as "How can I stop smoking?" They may even offer resources to someone who was sexually assaulted.

    But they're not quite there yet, a new study reveals.

    Researchers wanted to see how well ChatGPT performed for people seeking information and resources ...

    A new liver dialysis device might soon be able to save patients on the edge of death from liver failure, early clinical trial results show.

    The DIALIVE device safely improved organ function and alleviated symptoms in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure, compared with others receiving standard care, the researchers reported.

    If the device proves out in a larger trial, it cou...

    A Dutch man with paralyzed legs can now stand and walk, thanks to a wireless brain-spine interface that responds to his thoughts by moving his legs.

    Gert-Jan Oskam, 40, suffered a spinal cord injury 11 years ago from a bike accident in China that left him unable to walk.

    Oskam now has a brain implant that picks up signals of movement that, in a healthy person, would travel down the ...

    Brain cancers are notoriously difficult to treat because most chemotherapy drugs can't breach the blood-brain barrier, a microscopic layer of cells that protect the brain from toxins.

    But researchers now say they can temporarily open that barrier and get more chemo to brain tumors, using an experimental ultrasound device.

    The technology led to a four- to sixfold increase in chemo dr...

    Could an electronic chest “tattoo” -- wireless, lightweight and razor-thin -- upend heart monitoring and lower the odds of heart disease for folks who are at high-risk?

    Just possibly.

    The clear patch in question is not quite 4 by 5 inches in size, weighs less than an ounce, and is powered by a battery no bigger than a penny and just like a temporary tattoo sticker, it's designe...

    A mind-reading device seems like science fiction, but researchers say they're firmly on the path to building one.

    Using functional MRI (fMRI), a newly developed brain-computer interface can read a person's thoughts and translate them into full sentences, according to a report publish...

    Only five months have passed since the world got its first taste of the ground-breaking artificial intelligence (AI) tool known as ChatGPT.

    Promising a brave new world of human-machine connectivity, AI demonstrates near-instantaneous access to in-depth information on almost any subject, all in full conversational sentences, often delivered in a human-sounding voice.

    A

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 28, 2023
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  • Artificial intelligence (AI) may help clinicians diagnose tuberculosis in parts of the world where radiologists are scarce, a new study suggests.

    AI software successfully identified tuberculosis (TB) from cellphone photos of chest X-ray images, researchers reported at a European conference this week.

    “We've shown that AI software is at least as good at detecting TB as a trai...

    New research in mice shows promise for a potential therapy for pancreatic cancer, which can be aggressive and hard to treat.

    Researchers from Houston Methodist tested a device that, while smaller than a grain of rice, could deliver immunotherapy directly into a pancreatic tum...

    Cutting-edge AI technologies that can detect subtle changes in a person's voice may help doctors diagnose Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive impairments even before other symptoms begin.

    In a new study, researchers used advanced machine learning and natural...

    Wireless pacemakers could be a safe and effective short-term option for children with slow heartbeats, a new study suggests.

    Children with a heartbeat that's too slow — a condition called bradycardia — need a pacemaker to keep their hearts beating normally.

    Researchers successfully implanted wireless pacemakers into 62 kids to see if the cutting-edge devices could be safely used...

    ChatGPT, the AI chatbot everyone is talking about, can often give reliable answers to questions about breast cancer, a new study finds. But it's not yet ready to replace your physician.

    The big caveat, researchers said, is that the information is not always trustworthy, or offers only a small part of the story. So at least for now, they said, take your medical questions to your human doct...

    Scientists have created an embryo-like structure using monkey embryonic stem cells for the first time, part of an effort to better understand early human development and organ formation.

    The researchers created the structures in a lab in China and then transferred them into the uteruses of female monkeys, according to a report published April 6 in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

    <...

    It's machine: 1, man: 0 in the latest battle between artificial intelligence (AI) technology and human health care pros.

    This time researchers set out to see if cardiologists could tell the difference between AI and a sonographer's assessments of a key measure of heart health on ultrasound images.

    Spoiler alert: They couldn't.

    “This is a machine beats man situation,” said...

    Telehealth appointments — meetings with a doctor through a phone or video call — are valuable tools in the fight against opioid use disorder in the United States, researchers say.

    The use of telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic, along with medications for addiction, reduced the risk for fatal overdose among Medicare recipients, a new study finds.

    The study findings support co...

    Cynthia Elford had recently lost her left leg to type 1 diabetes, after a sunburned big toe turned nearly black and forced an amputation.

    Now, Elford was being told the same thing was happening in her right leg.

    “I went to clip the toenail on the big toe of my right leg and I nipped my skin, just nipped it, and it was enough that it didn't heal,” said Elford, 63, of Hermitage, P...

    A medical device used to diagnose and treat pancreatic and bile duct disease is getting attention from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration after pieces have fallen off and remained in patients' bodies.

    Previously, the FDA had expressed

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 24, 2023
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  • Just like adults, young children with type 1 diabetes may get the blood sugar control they need using an "artificial pancreas," new research shows.

    The Control-IQ artificial pancreas system was tested in a clinical trial in children aged 2 to 6.

    Using the technology developed at the University of Virginia (UVA), these children spent approximately three more hours per day in their ...

    Newer scanning technology may spot more breast cancers and lower the rate of dreaded false positives, a large, new study shows.

    Now available in a growing number of health care facilities, tomosynthesis uses low-dose X-rays and computer reconstructions to create 3D images of the breasts to find cancers. In contrast, traditional mammography creates 2D images of the breasts.

    "Tom...

    A quicker, safer option for treating an irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation might be just months away.

    Atrial fibrillation is currently treated with drugs or a procedure known as thermal ablation. Thermal ablation uses extreme temperatures to disable areas of the heart causing the abnormal heart rhythm. The new system -- called pulsed field ablation -- uses electricity instead ...

    A stick-on sensor may help keep people with heart failure out of the hospital, new research suggests.

    Investigators found that when doctors had actionable information about patients' conditions, delivered remotely through this noninvasive device, it prompted them to adjust medications earlier and prevent complications from escalating. Patients with heart failure who used this device were...

    Swedish scientists say they have grown electrodes in living tissue, paving the way for formation of fully integrated electronic circuits in living organisms.

    The development, which blurs the lines between biology and technology, could one day lead to therapies for neurological disorders.

    “For several decades, we have tried to create electronics that mimic biology. Now we let biolo...

    If you're one of the millions of people with a pacemaker or an implantable defibrillator to help control abnormal heart rhythms, certain health-tracking devices may do more harm than good.

    Smartwatches, rings or scales that emit electrical currents can interfere with these lifesaving implantable heart devices, causing them to malfunction, a new study suggests.

    “While the elec...

    It's a brutal reality that confronts many recovering stroke patients: After six months or so of rehab, any arm and hand movement not yet restored is unlikely to return.

    But new cutting-edge research aims to use electrical stimulation to jumpstart stroke-interrupted communication betw...

    After living with disabling low back pain for nearly 30 years, Dennis Bassett, 64, finally has a new lease on life.

    The Hempstead, N.Y., native injured his back in the 1980s when helping a friend. He tried everything to relieve his back pain, from self-medication, acupuncture, and chiropractor work to steroid injections, physical therapy and exercise.

    “My back only got worse,” r...

    An artificial pancreas has long been considered the holy grail for people with type 1 diabetes, and new research suggests a more convenient version of this technology may help the millions of people living with type 2 diabetes.

    Type 2 is the more common form of diabetes, and is clos...

    Patients with an incurable, genetic liver disease have new hope after an animal study showed that a single drug could reverse its effects.

    Alagille syndrome is caused by a mutation that prevents the formation and regeneration of bile ducts in the liver.

    About 4,000 babies a year are born with this condition. Often, they require a liver transplant, which is not always available. With...

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