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Preventing noise-related hearing loss from a loud concert, a banging jackhammer or a rifle blast could be as simple as managing levels of zinc within the inner ear, a new study reports.

Such hearing loss stems from cellular damage associated with an excess of free-floating zinc in the inner ear, researchers say.

Lab mouse experiments showed drugs that soak up the excess zinc can hel...

Could drugs that give a boost to men's sexual performance help them stave off Alzheimer's disease?

That's the main finding from a study suggesting that erectile dysfunction meds like Cialis, Levitra and Viagra might lower the odds for the memory-robbing illness.

The study wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect, cautioned British researchers at University College London.

“...

No one's brain is as sharp at 60 as it was at 20.

However, new research supports the notion that folk's brains can make subtle adjustments with age to compensate for that decline.

A team of British researchers has found more evidence that as the mind ages, it sometimes recruits help from certain brain regions to make up for deficits elsewhere.

This does not happen for everyo...

Scientists say they've created the first 3D-printed brain tissue where neurons network and "talk" to each other.

The breakthrough could be an advance for studying neurological processes in the lab, say a team from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

“This could be a hugely powerful model to help us understand how brain cells and parts of the brain communicate in humans,” said s...

New research suggests healthy lifestyles can help stave off dementia, perhaps by building a resilient 'cognitive reserve' in the aging brain.

The study was based on the brain autopsies on 586 people who lived to an average of almost 91. Researchers compared each person's lifestyle and end-of-life mental skills to their neurological signs of dementia, such as brain protein plaques or chang...

It's known by the street name "gas station heroin," but a new government report finds the highly addictive supplement Neptune's Fix may also contain synthetic pot.

The product has already been linked to seizures, brain swelling and hallucinations, researchers reported Thursday in Morbidity and Mortality Wee...

Advanced brain recording techniques have revealed how neurons in the human brain work together to produce speech.

The recordings provide a detailed map of how people think about what words they want to say and then speak them aloud, researchers report in the Jan. 31 issue of the journal Nature.

Specifically, t...

Women with a common ovarian disorder might be more likely to have memory and thinking problems in middle age, a new study suggests.

Females diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) scored lower on cognitive tests than women without the condition, according to a report published Jan. 31 in the journal Neurology.

The condition specifically appeared to affect memory, at...

Radon, an invisible, naturally occurring radioactive gas, appears to raise a person's risk of stroke, a new study suggests.

Already known as the second leading cause of lung cancer, these new findings suggest exposure to radon can increase risk of stroke by as much as 14%, according to a report published Jan. 31 in the journal Neurology.

“Our research found an increased r...

A walk in the woods appears to sharpen the mind better than an urban asphalt amble, a new brain scan study finds.

People strolling through an arboretum at the University of Utah performed better on brain function tests than those who walked around an asphalt-laden medical campus, according to findings published recently in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 1, 2024
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  • Elon Musk, co-founder of Neuralink, said this week that the company placed the first brain implant in a human over the weekend.

    In a statement posted on X, the platform formerly known as Twitter that is now owned by Musk, the billionaire said the patient was “recovering well.” He added that...

    Five of eight British children who received human growth hormone from the pituitary glands of deceased donors went on to develop early-onset Alzheimer's disease many decades later, researchers report.

    Researchers at University College London (UCL) suspect that the growth hormone received by these people in childhood may have contained amyloid-beta protein plaques, which build up in the br...

    Stuart Douglas, 78, has played the accordion all his long life.

    “I learned to play the accordion as a boy living in a mining village in Fife and carried on throughout my career in the police force and beyond,” said Douglas, of Cornwall, England. “These days I still play regularly, and playing in the band also keeps my calendar full, as we often perform in public.”

    Douglas' p...

    'Young folk don't write in cursive anymore' is a common complaint of older folks in this keyboard-obsessed age.

    Now, new research suggests that kids who ignore handwriting are, in fact, missing out: By the time they reach college, their brain "connectivity" may be weaker than folks who write regularly.

    In a study of 36 university students, "we show that when writing by hand, brain c...

    Strange visual disturbances occur early in about 10% of Alzheimer's cases, and when this happens it almost always signals the impending arrival of the disease, a new study finds.

    The condition is called posterior cortical atrophy (PCA). It involves a sudden difficulty in performing vision-related tasks -- for example writing, judging whether an object is moving or stationary, or easily pi...

    Two new strategies using deep brain stimulation can improve symptoms of Parkinson's disease, Duke University researchers have found.

    Doctors can efficiently improve symptoms of Parkinson's by simultaneously targeting to key brain structures using a newly developed self-adjusting device, researchers recently reported in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 23, 2024
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  • A daily multivitamin could help people keep their brains healthy as they age, a new trial finds.

    Results suggest taking multivitamins could help prevent memory loss and slow cognitive aging among older adults, researchers report in the Jan. 18 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutritio...

    TUESDAY, Jan. 16, 2024 (HeathDay News) -- Folks often feel more alert and savvy after a great workout, and dopamine might be the reason why.

    A small, new study by British and Japanese researchers found higher levels of the "feel good" brain neurotransmitter were released by men during exercise.

    In turn, that seemed tied to better performance on thinking tests, the researchers said....

    Magnetic zaps to the brain can significantly help people with severe depression, if the procedure is guided using MRI brain scans, a new clinical trial has concluded.

    On average, patients showed substantial improvements in depression, anxiety, cognition and quality of life for at least six months after undergoing MRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), results show.

    One-...

    There's information emerging on how the common Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) might be crucial to triggering multiple sclerosis (MS).

    The virus, which also causes "mono" (mononucleosis) and other illnesses, has gained prominence in recent years as a potential cause of MS. Over 95% of people are thought to carry EBV, although for most people it remains dormant.

    Now, a team of Texan researc...

    Exposing babies and toddlers to TV and other digital media could be linked to a heightened risk for dysfunction in what's known as "sensory processing," a new study warns.

    Kids with "atypical sensory processing" are often hypersensitive to the touch, sound, taste or look of stimuli in their environment.

    For example, kids might try to avoid the feel of certain clothing, the taste of...

    How much a person believes in the strength of a drug might influence how powerfully that drug influences brain activity, a new study has found.

    Smokers told to expect a low, medium or high dose of nicotine from an e-cigarette showed a brain response that tracked with the purported dose, even though nicotine levels were actually constant, researchers said.

    “We set out to investiga...

    An electrical zap to the brain can temporarily render a person more susceptible to hypnosis, a new study shows.

    Participants became more easily hypnotized after paddles placed against their scalp delivered two 46-second rounds of electrical pulses to a precise location in their brain, researchers reported Jan. 4 in the journal Nature Mental Health.

    This increase in their su...

    THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2023 (HeathDay News) -- Muscle cells' "power stations" function less effectively in people with long COVID, potentially explaining the persistent fatigue that's a hallmark of the condition.

    That's the finding of a Dutch study published Jan. 4 in the journal Nature Communications.

    "We're seeing clear changes in ...

    From alcohol use to social isolation, poor hearing and heart disease, researchers have identified more than a dozen non-genetic factors that up the risk of dementia for people under 65.

    Though about 370,000 new cases a year of young-onset dementia are diagnosed worldwide, it hasn't been well-researched.

    Now, a large study from scientists in the U.K. and the Netherlands suggests that...

    A new cellular therapy improved learning and memory in mice with Alzheimer's disease, researchers report.

    The therapy -- developed at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) -- relies on both the immune system to fight key aspects of Alzheimer's, plus modified cells that zero in on the brain protein plaques that are a hallmark of the disease.

    In patients with Alzheimer's, ...

    For the growing number of American seniors who live alone, having a beloved dog or cat by their side could help them maintain a healthy brain.

    New research on more than 7,900 people averaging 66 years of age found that those who lived alone were able to stave off losses in memory and thinking if they had a pet.

    Pet ownership didn't seem to affect the cognition of older folks who li...

    Measles is incredibly contagious, and outbreaks are more common now as people decide against vaccinating their kids.

    Now, a case involving a rare but fatal brain disease caused by the measles virus may make some rethink that decision.

    The patient caught measles as a child. It took years for the virus to migrate to their brain, where it mutated and caused the fatal illness, accordi...

    Are you necessarily at higher risk of Alzheimer's disease just because you're 80, and not 75? New research shows it's more complex than that.

    The findings suggest that it's the pace of buildup in the brain of Alzheimer's-linked amyloid protein plaques that matters most, not age.

    “Our findings are consistent with studies showing that the amyloid accumulation in the brain takes de...

    Smoking shrinks the human brain, and once that brain mass is lost then it's gone for good, a new study warns.

    Brain scans from more than 32,000 people strongly link a history of smoking with a gradual loss of brain volume. In fact, the more packs a person smoked per day, the smaller their brain volume, researchers found.

    The study also establishes the potential series of events that...

    Regular exercise appears to enhance and even grow crucial areas of the human brain, new research using MRI scans shows.

    It's long been known that physical activity is a brain-booster, but this international study illustrates ways this could be happening.

    “With comprehensive imaging scans, our study underscores the interconnected synergy between the body and the brain," said study...

    A study involving twins suggests that if you have a sibling who develops dementia, that might not bode well for your life span.

    That's true even if you don't go on to develop dementia yourself, according to a study from U.S. and Swedish researchers.

    One investigator was surprised by the finding.

    “We expected a different result. We expected that, in twins where one developed ...

    Loss of the “happiness” brain hormone serotonin might play a role in the decline of brain function as a person ages, a new study reports.

    People with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) had up to 25% lower levels of serotonin than healthy people in key regions of the brain associated with memory, problem-solving and emotion, researchers reported recently in the

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 11, 2023
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  • When an HIV-infected child known as the 'Mississippi baby' was given powerful antiretroviral drugs within hours of birth in 2013 and then appeared to be rid of HIV, people wondered if it might be replicated in other newborns.

    An international study involving 54 babies suggests it can.

    Researchers now believe that if HIV-infected newborns receive antiretroviral therapy (ART) within t...

    Patients in the earliest stages of multiple sclerosis might develop certain symptoms that offer an early clue to the degenerative nerve disease, researchers report.

    Depression, constipation, urinary tract infections and sexual problems are all more likely in MS patients five years before their official diagnosis, compared with people who never develop MS, researchers found.

    Those co...

    New research challenges a long-held notion that human newborns enter the world with brains that are significantly less developed than those of other primates.

    Babies are born extremely helpless and with poor muscle control, and human brains grow much larger and more complex than other species following birth, investigators said.

    Because of those observations, it's long been believed...

    People with epilepsy suffer quicker declines in thinking than people without the brain disorder, particularly if they also have risk factors like high blood pressure or diabetes, a new study finds.

    The difference was significant: Over the course of the 14-year study, those with epilepsy experienced a 65% to 70% faster decline in memory and thinking skills.

    On top of that, having ris...

    Gina Arata had a bright future, wrapping up college and preparing for law school, when a 2001 car wreck left her with lasting brain damage.

    After her recovery, Arata wound up taking a job sorting mail, but struggled even in that.

    “I couldn't remember anything,” said Arata, who lives in Modesto with her parents. “My left foot dropped, so I'd trip over things all the time. I was...

    Doing some squats during commercial breaks or between YouTube videos can help couch potatoes keep their minds sharp, a new study suggests.

    Young volunteers who did short sets of squat exercises every now and then while relaxing performed better in brain games than when they simply sat around for hours, researchers report.

    Short bursts of exercise might help the brains of people who ...

    It might seem that surfing the web could cause a person's mental health to suffer, but a landmark new study has concluded that internet use poses no major threat to people's psychological well-being.

    Researchers compared country-level internet and broadband use to the mental well-being of millions of people in dozens of countries, and came away with no evidence that the internet is causin...

    Personal trainers can help people increase their strength and their fitness.

    Could a “brain coach” be just as useful in preventing Alzheimer's' disease?

    A new study suggests that personalized health and lifestyle changes can delay or even prevent memory loss for older adults at high risk of Alzheimer's or dementia.

    People who received personal coaching experienced a 74% bo...

    Medical imaging for thinking and memory issues happens much later in Black patients than in their white and Hispanic counterparts, new research shows.

    A study to be presented Thursday at a meeting of radiologists also revealed that Black patients were less ofte...

    Whole grains could be the key to Black people protecting their brains against aging and dementia, a new study reports.

    Black folks who ate more foods with whole grains appeared to have a slower rate of memory decline than those who ate fewer whole grains, according to findings published Nov. 23 in the journal Neurology.

    Among Black people, those who ate the most whole grain...

    MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2023 (HeathDay News) -- More female surgeons are entering the field, which brings up a new question: Are your surgical outcomes likely to be better if your gender matches that of your surgeon?

    The answer seems to be "probably not."

    A study from University of California Los Angeles researchers found little evidence that patient-surgeon "gender concordance" matters to...

    People with long COVID exhibit brain changes that are different from the brains of fully recovered COVID-19 patients, a new brain scan study reports.

    COVID-19 induced a specific pattern of microscopic structural changes in various brain regions of people with long COVID, researchers will report at the upcoming annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

    “To...

    • Dennis Thompson and Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporters
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    • November 27, 2023
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    A year after suffering a concussion, teens, especially boys, are more likely than their peers to think about, plan and even attempt suicide, new research finds.

    With more concussions, the risk grows.

    Teen boys who reported two or more concussions in the past year were two times more likely to report a suicide attempt than those who had one concussion. Girls' odds for suicidal behav...

    Shrinkage of one of the brain's key memory centers appears to herald thinking declines, a new study finds.

    The region in question is the hippocampus, a two-sided structure located roughly above each ear and embedded deep within the brain's temporal lobe. It's long been known to play a crucial role in the storage and transference of short- and long-term memory.

    The new research was ...

    An experimental device that isolates blood flow to the brain has the potential to revolutionize brain research.

    The device redirects the brain's blood supply through a pump that maintains or adjusts a range of variables necessary to maintain the organ, including blood pressure, temperature, oxygenation and nutrients, researchers report.

    When tested on a pig brain, the device maintai...

    An adolescent starts thinking like an adult right around the age of 18, according to new research.

    That provides some of the first definitive evidence that executive function matures by that time.

    Executive function is a set of mental skills that include the ability to plan, switch between tasks, resist tempting distractions and focus.

    For

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 6, 2023
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  • A seizure doesn't always look like what you see in the movies, but a new survey finds most Americans don't know what the more subtle signs of seizures are.

    “Anything that interrupts your brain's circuit can cause seizures, from tumors, infections and strokes to high or low blood sugar, or glucose levels, to inherited genetic features. And different types of seizures can present with doz...

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